Archive for the ‘Siemens Machine Tool Systems’ Category

emailblast_01

computerGot a few minutes?

Learn to be a better machinist in 30 minutes or less at Eastec 2015!

Come to Siemens booth #2012 at the show and one of their machining experts will show you how easy it really is!

  • Reduce CNC programming, setup and machining times
  • Setup a program from a file and prep your offsets
  • Provide quick and reliable shopfloor program simulation
  • Run an actual part program in real-time
  • Use the data to calculate workflow — saving you time
  • Avoid machine component collision
  • Make yourself a more valuable employee to your shop or production department
  • And much more!

sinutrain

See the difference SINUTRAIN can really make
SINUTRAIN functions exactly the same way as an actual Siemens CNC system. This means you can test all of the operating modes of the graphical user interface step-by-step. Not only is SINUMERIK the top-performing machine tool control in shops worldwide, Siemens also offers training that’s second-to-none. You’ll quickly learn that, with Siemens onboard your machines — anything is possible.

Register to attend EASTEC — compliments of Siemens.

sinutrainorangeSimply participate in one of Siemens in-booth demonstrations during the show and you’ll receive your trial version free-of-charge!

Zimmermann portal milling machine features twin gantries, twin rotary 6-axis milling heads, twin CNCs with completely independent operability to machine parts up to 960 inches in length

Triumph Structures – Wichita, a Triumph Group company, brought a unique challenge to the engineers at Zimmermann (Novi, Michigan) and the solution has yielded various benefits to this major supplier of aerospace components. As Harry Thurmond – President at Triumph Structures – Wichita explains, “We had requirements for spars and stringers that often reached 22’ in length, but we also do a variety of production jobs on smaller sections such as bulkheads. This creates the need for fast, reliable and adaptable machine tools.” In this current mode of manufacturing, Triumph Structures – Wichita considered a variety of options to expand on the capabilities of their existing milling machines, some of which had been in operation for decades.

Triumph Structures–Wichita Machines Wing Spars and Skins on Huge Dual Gantry Mill;  Realizes 35 Percent Cycle Time Improvement | Siemens Machine Tool Systems

View down the entire length of the workspace, showing the twin heads and the break wall removed for continuous machining a single workpiece, with co-dependent gantry and CNC operability

Triumph Structures – Wichita specializes in complex, high speed, monolithic precision machining and sub assembly of Aluminum and Titanium structural airframe components often with wall thicknesses down to 0.020 inches. Currently, 21 individual 5-axis machining centers are resident in this facility, with a maximum length of 960 inches. Over 20 other 3-axis and 4-axis machines complete the machining capability for aluminum structures. Triumph Structures – Wichita runs a gamut from build-to-print precision machining of aluminum and hard metal, small-to-large parts, especially aircraft wing spars, Skins, bulkheads, and landing gear components.

While the machine capabilities at Triumph Structures – Wichita were clearly substantial, it was determined that a need existed for a particular machine that could be used to serve multiple purposes. First, the machining of very long parts with volumetric compensation to manage material expansion and the tool tip position over a very long cutting cycle, often multiple days, was required. Triumph Structures – Wichita has extensive experience in this area, given its market focus. However, it was posited that a single machine might also be capable of running multiple smaller parts or operate in twin fashion, occasionally using the entire machine bed with both heads working the same part in tandem. Clearly, the latter scenario would demand extremely close attention to collision avoidance between the gantries, as well as the consistency of surface machining at the points where the twin machining heads intersected.

Triumph Structures–Wichita Machines Wing Spars and Skins on Huge Dual Gantry Mill;  Realizes 35 Percent Cycle Time Improvement | Siemens Machine Tool Systems

Zimmermann twin gantry portal milling machine built to suit the special requirements of Triumph Structures in Wichita

For the requirements presented by Triumph Structures – Wichita, the optimal machine necessitated that Zimmermann, a longtime partner and portal machine supplier to Triumph, modify its popular FZ100 machine with twin gantries, each equipped with a three rotary axis head and independent Siemens Sinumerik 840D sl CNC.

As Zimmermann Inc. President Matthias Tockook notes, “We had a variety of machine styles available, but the best solution was a head with three rotary axes, A-B-C integrated in a forked milling head. This provided simultaneous 6-axis cutting in a very compact design, with no pole position, less overall axis rotation, a constant feedrate capability and improved surface quality.”

Triumph Structures–Wichita Machines Wing Spars and Skins on Huge Dual Gantry Mill;  Realizes 35 Percent Cycle Time Improvement | Siemens Machine Tool Systems

A unique head design from Zimmermann is based on three rotary axes. Full 6-axis machining is achieved with 125 RMS inside and 32 RMS outside finish

The individual head machining time scenario was further detailed. If the maximum time was achieved using an A- and C-head with infinite C-axis, the alternative A-B-C integrated rotary axis head could accomplish the same work in 25 percent of that time.

In designing the final work envelope and machine structure, Zimmermann engineers determined the best solution was a removable break wall built into the midpoint of the machine bed, which would allow completely independent operation of the entire machine, literally running as two machine tools in one. When removed, the machine bed could accept parts up to 960 inches in length and process them using the twin heads working in tandem and monitored for total collision avoidance by the two CNCs onboard. Owing to the unique volumetric compensation feature of the Siemens CNC, where the execution of the machining is based upon the actual tool tip position, the point of intersection for the twin heads was found to be an easily addressed and resolved issue. Surface integrity on the workpiece would be preserved, while machine and operator safety would remain paramount.

This machine was built over a period of eighteen months. Parts were sent to Zimmerman to be fully tested prior to being erected onsite at Triumph Structures – Wichita.

Triumph Structures–Wichita Machines Wing Spars and Skins on Huge Dual Gantry Mill;  Realizes 35 Percent Cycle Time Improvement | Siemens Machine Tool Systems

With doors closed and the break wall installed, photo also shows one of the two Siemens Sinumerik CNC units on the machine. In this setup, each of the two work envelopes of the machine can run simultaneously yet completely independent of the other

In operation, according to Harry Thurmond, the Zimmermann head design provides significant advantages in speed on the typical peaks and pockets found in aerospace structure machining, working in tandem with the look-ahead feature on the CNC. “It slows down and speeds up in anticipation of the next required surface contour. Over long run times, this can translate into an improvement of 35 percent or better, because there is no deburring or polishing required. We routinely get better than a 125 RMS finish on inside pocket surfaces and up to a 32 RMS on the outside of the Series 7000 aluminums we run. Combined with the flexibility of the machine to work a single structure or individual workpieces simultaneously, we have been quite satisfied with the results to date.” On longer runs, Thurmond adds, the chilled coolant used on the Zimmermann is helpful in minimizing thermal expansion of the material, a critical factor in long run machining work here. An added advantage, the machine is used to produce workholding and fixturing devices. Lastly, Harry noted that the Zimmermann machine is equipped with test probes, so it can be used as a CMM to measure workpieces in process.

The 3-axis head avoids the pole position of the traditional 2-axis A-C head at A = 0º. In this Zimmermann head design, the B-axis moves +/- 15º inside a rigid curved guideway for handling the inner sloping and especially the pockets typically found on aero structures, so simultaneous 6-axis machining is achieved with high surface finish integrity.

The new machine at Triumph Structures – Wichita is further equipped with a stationary clamping table, fixed mounted side walls, DemTec composite fill on the base and side walls for enhanced stability and vibration damping. Backlash-free drives on both sides with rack-and-pinion mechanisms are sealed from contamination and guided on both sides. All axes have feed rates to 60m/min and accelerations to 4m/sec2. Each head can access a 60-position toolchanger on the machine.

For communication of data from the machine, Triumph Structures – Wichita integrates the CNCs into their Ethernet network via DNC and hard-wiring. Through a remote monitoring feature on the Sinumerik 840D SL CNC, Zimmermann is also able to maintain awareness of all conditions on the machine in real-time.

At Triumph Structures – Wichita, design to CENIT CAM post-processor operations are done through Vericut simulation at the CAD station.

Triumph Structures–Wichita Machines Wing Spars and Skins on Huge Dual Gantry Mill;  Realizes 35 Percent Cycle Time Improvement | Siemens Machine Tool Systems

A unique head design from Zimmermann is based on three rotary axes. Full 6-axis machining is achieved with 125 RMS inside and 32 RMS outside finish

Harry Thurmond notes, “We had grown steadily over the last decades, since our incorporation of 5-axis work in the 1990s, and were ready to jump to a new level of competence for our customers, who represent the top players in both commercial and military aircraft, making Triumph Structures – Wichita a more value-adding supplier. Our part length capability had been 22’ here in Wichita and we were committed to expanding it, to compete in the 40’-80’ part ranges. As with all aerospace structure machining, material removal rates are extremely high. We can start with a 5600 lb. workpiece that ends up at 100 lb., for example.” Harry further noted this means the machines at Triumph Structures – Wichita must be very robust with high-precision control of the cutting cycles, which often run for multiple days.

Commenting on the CNC selection, Matthias Tockook of Zimmermann observed, “With all the challenges we had on this machine, including the axes of motion, the integration of the twin gantry movements, the substantial safety factors involved and the need for independent and also co-dependent gantry operations, we quickly determined that only twin Sinumerik 840D sl CNCs could handle this job.” The machine built for Triumph Structures – Wichita also includes Siemens servo motors and drives plus spindles running at 73kW/95HP and 27,000 rpm in operation.

Triumph Structures – Wichita specializes in complex, high speed, monolithic precision machining and sub assembly of Aluminum and Titanium structural airframe components.

For more information on this story, please contact:

Siemens Industry, Inc.
Drive Technologies — Motion Control (Machine Tool)
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web: www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
Email: SiemensMTBUMarCom.industry@siemens.com
Attention: John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communications

Others involved in this story may also be contacted:

Zimmermann Inc. — Portal Milling Machines
24371 Catherine Industrial Drive
Suite 233
Novi, MI 48375
Phone: 248-305-9707
Web: www.zimmermann-inc.com
Email: matthias@zimmermann-in.com
Attention: Matthias Tockook, President

Triumph Structures – Wichita
3258 S. Hoover Rd.
Wichita, KS 67215
Phone: 316-942-0432
Web: www.triumphgroup.com
Email: hthurmond@triumphgroup.com
Harry Thurmond, President

Large parts and one-off runs present particular challenges; common CNC platform offers many benefits to busy York, PA shop

Despite the large, heavy workpieces and frequent one-off production, Voith Hydro maintains a steady flow of work for its machining, typically holding +/- 0.002” tolerances on various carbon and stainless steels.  Workpieces here often exceed 25’ in diameter.

Despite the large, heavy workpieces and frequent one-off production, Voith Hydro maintains a steady flow of work for its machining, typically holding +/- 0.002” tolerances on various carbon and stainless steels. Workpieces here often exceed 25’ in diameter.


Voith Hydro in York, Pennsylvania is a major manufacturer of hydroelectric power generation equipment, especially the intricate turbines used in such operations, supplying hydroelectric generating companies and municipalities throughout North America. Over 12,000 units have been commissioned in the field with more than 65,000 MW of installed capacity, plus Voith Hydro has also upgraded over 600 existing power generation units. As a turnkey supplier to the industry, the company manages all phases of power plant projects, from analysis and planning, design and implementation, to commissioning and operation. Voith Hydro is ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 Certified.

Milling, line boring and turning operations are performed on large multi-axis machine tools, most equipped with Siemens SINUMERIK 840D CNC onboard to control all axes of motion.

Milling, line boring and turning operations are performed on large multi-axis machine tools, most equipped with Siemens SINUMERIK 840D CNC onboard to control all axes of motion.

At the York facility, very large multi-axis machining centers produce carbon and stainless steel work pieces, most often in a one-off mode and at sizes frequently exceeding 35’ in diameter. Adam Ward, the manager of maintenance & facilities at Voith Hydro, says the machining done typically holds +/- 0.002” tolerances here, nonetheless. “We do turning, line boring and milling on extremely large and heavy work pieces that often challenge us to design the optimum machining cycle. Our long cycles can frequently result in heat distortion on material surfaces and so we take great care in looking for problems before they occur.”

Voith Hydro maintains an impressive array of machine tools and multi-axis machining centers here. Despite a variety of builder brands, the majority of the machines have one common component, namely, the Siemens SINUMERIK 840D CNC onboard.

Remote condition monitoring is performed between Voith Hydro and many of its machine tool builders to troubleshoot and resolve issues in real time, using the CNC on the machine.

Remote condition monitoring is performed between Voith Hydro and many of its machine tool builders to troubleshoot and resolve issues in real time, using the CNC on the machine.

As Ward notes, “Our operators are quite comfortable with the CNC from Siemens and they use it for all motion control, plus the operator interface has the ability to afford us great troubleshooting capability and something else we value greatly, the commonality of the HMI on the control. That fact allows us to do a great deal of cross-training and that’s very important to us. We need to be highly flexible, given the one-off nature of our work here.” Most of the operators at Voith Hydro are capable of running multiple machines, while the maintenance personnel on his team can more easily service the machining equipment in the facility, adds Ward. He credits his machine builders and the Siemens team led by Howard Weinstein and Robert Stiefel for this ongoing flexibility.

Part designs are run through the company’s CAM system and simulated offline to preserve machine uptime.

Part designs are run through the company’s CAM system and simulated offline to preserve machine uptime.

Voith typically takes a customer design, runs it through their CAM system and simulates the cycle offline, in order to preserve valuable machine uptime. Since the work here involves highly complex geometries on the turbine sections, the simulation must be equally complex and account for all machine motions and collision avoidance. Once the program is finally determined for a part, it is fed over the Voith Hydro network to the appropriate machine tool or machining center for scheduling and production startup.

During production, a system of real-time remote condition monitoring is available through the CNC for troubleshooting by both the Voith Hydro maintenance personnel and, when required, machine builder personnel, working offsite.

Large Ingersoll milling machine was retrofit recently, with all new Siemens CNC, motors, drives and other hardware.

Large Ingersoll milling machine was retrofit recently, with all new Siemens CNC, motors, drives and other hardware.

Ward cites one example where an Ingersoll milling machine was completely retrofitted both mechanically and electrically by a Siemens Solution Partner, with a new CNC, motors, drives, encoders, other hardware and software. “Working with the builder and Siemens support personnel, we were able to resolve issues and implement changes to the programming, right on the CNC of the machine…and all done remotely, in a very short time period.”

Voith Hydro in York, PA produces a wide variety of power generation components for various machine builders and municipalities across America.

Voith Hydro in York, PA produces a wide variety of power generation components for various machine builders and municipalities across America.

Voith Hydro boasts machining capabilities on workpieces over 42’ diameter and 350 tons at the York facility. Surface finishes are typically 250 and 125 Ra, though occasionally 64 or 32 Ra is required. The finishes are achieved through both machining and secondary finishing operations, according to company sources.

Adam Ward further notes that, on most new machines required at Voith Hydro, “The cross-training capability of the CNC, the standardization of the HMI on various types of machines, the support provided and the previous successes our operators and maintenance personnel have realized, all combine to make specifying Siemens as our control of choice an easy decision.”

Howard Weinstein, business development manager for the power industry manufacturing sector at Siemens, comments on the relationship with Voith, “We’re a proud partner to Voith Hydro in York, Pennsylvania. Their facility is a great showcase for our flagship CNC, the SINUMERIK 840D, as used on an array of multi-axis machining centers to produce large, complex geometry parts for the hydroelectric power industry.”

For more information on this story, please contact:

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
DRIVE TECHNOLOGIES –  MOTION CONTROL (MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS)
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communication

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Others involved in this story may also be contacted:

Voith Hydro
760 East Berlin Road
York, PA 17408-8701
Phone:  717-792-7512
Web:  www.voith.com
Email:  adam.ward@voith.com
Adam Ward, Manager of Maintenance & Facilities

Sinumerik CNC ensures high-quality guitar craftsmanship

Fryer Machine Systems supplies an American guitar builder with milling machines for the production of high-quality guitars. Right-angle head compensation is essential to the accurate, repeatable milling of guitar necks — an easy task for the Sinumerik 840D CNC on board Fryer machines.

The challenge of repeatable product performance is not new to C.F. Martin & Company. Six generations ago, company founder C. F. Martin Sr. was confronted with managing a guitar-making enterprise that was producing totally handcrafted guitars, one by one, with little means for standardization. Since those days, guitar legends such as Gene Autry, Eric Clapton, John Mayer and new-comers Ed Sheeran and Hunter Hayes have relied on ­the consistently distinctive tone, treble and bass specific to Martin acoustic guitars. When Martin learned that its previous machine tool builder had exited the market, the company turned to Fryer Machine Systems for new machines to cover a production increase and seized the opportunity to upgrade the control technology with Sinumerik CNCs.

Larry Fryer (left) and Mark Bickert from Martin Guitar are satisfied with Siemens CNC technology, service and part quality.

Larry Fryer (left) and Mark Bickert from Martin Guitar are satisfied with Siemens CNC technology, service and part quality.

Hands-on support in customizing the CNC

“We use right-angle head aggregates in our CNCs,” explains Mark Bickert, engineering project manager at Martin. “We needed to find a machine builder that could give us right-angle head aggregate capability in conjunction with right-angle head compensation and a high-rpm spindle.” Fryer Machine Systems has earned a reputation for building reliable production machines that come with unexpectedly advanced features and functionality. The company happens to be the largest purchaser of Siemens controls in the United States, and the customizable aspects of a Fryer machine can often be attributed to the versatility of the Siemens controls on board. This time, however, Martin needed to be certain that the new Fryer machines would perform as expected.

“Anyone can sell you a machine with a controller on it and say, ‘Here you go,’” Bickert says. “But that’s not what happened this time. We were buying a machine through a Fryer dealership, and the machine had a Siemens control. Siemens invested their time in us during our transition and set-up. They really excelled.”

Bickert says a potential constraint to the transition was that all-new milling programs might need to be written for the Fryer machines, including the right-angle head cutter compensation programs, which were essential. “Siemens not only gave us the right-angle head cutter compensation we wanted and the ability to do it properly, they also helped write the programs,” Bickert says. “They took the programs that we already had for cutting parts on our existing machines and reconfigured them to work in the Fryer machine with the Siemens controller.”

Guitar body castings now also machined in-house

Having made a smooth transition to the company’s new Fryer-built machines last year, Martin has not skipped a beat in its ability to perform right-angle compensation milling. Martin now has eight Fryer/Siemens machines, utilizing one for the guitar maker’s tooling and machinery operations and seven for various other guitar production operations. It is here, behind the scenes, that the company’s machinists reside and modern CNC technology and Old World craftsmanship come together to create the fixtures, tools and wherewithal that contribute to the mastery of Martin guitar making. It is also here that ­Martin found a way to bring previously outsourced operations in-house, a step that has improved repeatable production quality while reducing production costs. “The machining of our castings had been another hurdle for us,” says Terry Kline, Martin’s manager of tooling and machinery. Until the company invested in the Fryer machines with the Siemens controls, Martin had outsourced the machining of its guitar body castings, with inconsistent results. “Now we’re holding close tolerances on our guitar body castings,” Kline says. “The quality of the castings is consistently accurate.”

CNC technology meets craftsmanship

On a daily basis at Martin, Kline sees what is possible when CNC technology and craftsmanship work together. “Without CNC technology, we’d be still carving out all our necks by hand, and that’s just not efficient enough to compete in today’s world,” he says. The intersection of technology and craftsmanship has come naturally for this 180-year-old guitar company, without one side compromising the other. “I think every manufacturing company needs to ­embrace technology,” says Kline. “Technology and craftsmanship go hand-in-hand. People are amazed by how much handwork still goes into our guitars. We’ll build a neck and a body and then assemble the two elements together, which makes that guitar come to life.”

Right-angle head compensation is essential to the accurate milling of guitar neck components. The function requires the sophisticated Sinumerik 840D sl CNC and ShopMill software from Siemens. Guitar image courtesy of C.F. Martin & Company.

For more information on this story, please contact:

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
DRIVE TECHNOLOGIES –  MOTION CONTROL (MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS)
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communication

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.

Energy production specialist MCE uses a simultaneous 
five-axis mill-turn center with Sinumerik 840D sl 
for producing model running wheels in one setting and thereby reducing throughput time.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH CEO 
Gottfried Langthaler (right) and Buz Bozner, head of the Alzmetall Technology Center, agree: The efficiency of the Sinumerik 840D sl makes an important contribution to enabling simultaneous milling and turning in every position with the GS 1000/5-FTD.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH CEO 
Gottfried Langthaler (right) and Buz Bozner, head of the Alzmetall Technology Center, agree: The efficiency of the Sinumerik 840D sl makes an important contribution to enabling simultaneous milling and turning in every position with the GS 1000/5-FTD.

MCE Maschinen- und Apparatebau GmbH 
in Linz, Austria, produces various components for large gas, steam, and water turbines, as well as for wind power stations and other segments of energy production. But before the company receives any orders for these products, realistic models must prove their efficiency, underlines MCE CEO Gottfried Langthaler: “It is therefore very important for us to be able to manufacture 
the turbine models in high quality and, at the same time, productively with a short throughput time.”

In mid-2010, the running wheels were still being milled individually on a five-axis machining center 
and then bolted or welded together. The average throughput time was six weeks. Thanks to a few technical tricks and the Sinumerik-controlled GS 1000/5-FTD from Alzmetall, which has been used 
in model production since the end of 2010, the machining expert Langthaler was able to reduce throughput time by up to one-third — to about four weeks, depending on the product. As a qualified master of mechanical engineering and design, 
he already knew before purchasing the Alzmetall machine that it would be ideal for his model production if a Francis turbine could be produced from solid brass: “I was merely skeptical that a machining center could do that. After all, we have to achieve 
a high roughing cut and smooth with maximum 
precision and surface quality.” Initial tests with the GS 1000/5-FTD revealed that the technical conditions were right. Langthaler adds: “Alzmetall 
also flexibly adapted the machining center to our needs so that we can meet 
all the requirements regarding accuracy and surface quality — 
in one setting if necessary.”

B02b_Siemens_MCE-Alzmetall copy

User-friendly CNC for milling 
and turning jobs

Because this machine must also perform turning tasks, in addition to milling tasks, at MCE, this requirement is also in the specification and is met 
by the GS 1000/5-FTD. Buz Bozner, head of the 
Technology Center at Alzmetall, explains the technical basis: “We integrated torque motors in all round axes. We therefore achieve speeds of 300 rpm in 
the c-axis.” The mill-turn center offers an enormous machining space that not even standard lathes achieve. Parts with a diameter of up to 1,000 mm can therefore be machined. A highlight of the 
GS 1000/5-FTD is that it can be turned to any round axis position and level.

The energy professionals in model construction 
have been relying on Sinumerik controllers since the mid-1990s because, according to the mechanical engineering boss Langthaler, these were always 
convincing, especially in complex five-axis machining: “The handling of Sinumerik 840D is also clear and simple on the ShopMill and ShopTurn graphical user interfaces.” The operator 
can work particularly easily and clearly when a GS 1000/5-FTD with the new Sinumerik Operate user interface 
is used. Operation and programming always have 
the same structure, regardless of whether milling or turning processes are to be programmed and set-up. The operator is also supported by graphical displays and animations. Many intelligent functions are available, which are helpful, among other things, for tool and workpiece measurement. The operation and programming of 3+2 axis machining is also supported by the integrated Cycle800 functions. Animated 
Elements simplify the explanation of functions such as selection of the direction and free running, as well as swiveling.

Another highlight of the new GS 1000/5-FTD is the Sinumerik MDynamics technology package, which 
is especially important for complex five-axis machining. Maximum surface quality and exact contour accuracy can be achieved even more rapidly. The 
key is in the new Advanced Surface intelligent path control, which contains an optimized look-ahead function and an optimized online CNC data compressor, among other things. The integrated intelligent jolt limiter relieves stress on the machine mechanics because it enables gentle acceleration and deceleration despite extreme dynamic response.

B03a_Siemens_MCE_Alzmetal_1910

Customers reap the benefits

As a specialist in single-part and small-series production for small to large workpieces, MCE is equipped to meet even extraordinary demands on-time and with top quality. By equipping its machines with state-of-the-art Siemens technology, the company 
is able to achieve high throughput times in model production and pass these advantages on to its -customers.

For more information on this story, please contact:

SIEMENS INDUSTRY, INC.
DRIVE TECHNOLOGIES –  MOTION CONTROL (MACHINE TOOL BUSINESS)
390 Kent Avenue
Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Phone: 847-640-1595
Fax: 847-437-0784
Web:  www.usa.siemens.com/cnc
Email:  SiemensMTBUMarCom.sea@siemens.com
Attention:  John Meyer, Manager, Marketing Communication

Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/SiemensCNC or Twitter:  www.twitter.com/siemens_cnc_us.

Siemens Industry Sector is the world’s leading supplier of innovative and environmentally friendly products, solutions and services for industrial customers. With end-to-end automation technology and industrial software, solid vertical-market expertise, and technology-based services, the sector enhances its customers’ productivity, efficiency and flexibility. With a global workforce of more than 100,000 employees, the Industry Sector comprises the Industry Automation, Drive Technologies and Customer Services Divisions as well as the Metals Technologies Business Unit. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/industry.

The Siemens Drive Technologies Division is the world’s leading supplier of products, systems, applications, solutions and services for the entire drive train, with electrical and mechanical components. Drive Technologies serves all vertical markets in the production and process industries as well as the infrastructure/energy segment. With its products and solutions, the division enables its customers to achieve productivity, energy efficiency and reliability. For more information, visit http://www.usa.siemens.com/drivetechnologies.